Teaching

Teaching the piano is an important part of my life. In fact that's what I spend most of my time doing!

 

In my teaching practice I seek to inspire in my pupils a love for music, and to challenge them with artistic concepts which they may not have previously come across. I believe that every pupil is individual and special, and through the course of my teaching it is my aim to discover and nurture each pupil's particular abilities, talents, sensitivities and musical tastes.

 

Playing music is a highly demanding discipline, which one can excel at only with one's own devotion and countless hours of practice! As a teacher I endeavour to guide my pupils on this wonderful journey of music-making, encouraging each one to open their heart towards the beautiful expressive nature of music and what it tells us about the human condition.

Teaching Style

Beginners from the age of 6 learn to play the piano through simple nursery songs. The elements of pitch and rhythm are introduced through singing and clapping, and the concept of pulse is taught by getting the pupil to bounce a ball. The pupil is guided to approach the piano in a free, creative and unorthodox way.

 

This musical training is backed up by the teaching of music theory, composition and improvisation right from the beginning.

 

With this kind of early-years training, pupils develop a firm grasp of the main concepts of music, giving them foundations that exceed the value of just doing a prep-test or Grade 1.

 

Older pupils are guided in developing their technique and exposed to an unlimited range of styles of music. My teaching philosophy is that 'the pupil is always right'! Instead of relying on traditional teaching ideas, my aim is to help the pupil to discover what piano technique works best for them, and what styles of music they have most affinity for.

 

Pupils will frequently embark on music investigation assignments, in which they conduct their own research about a composer, a musical style, or a particular piece. I also guide my pupils in exploring the contemporary music of our time, as a way of interpreting modern culture. Whatever the pupil chooses to play, it is my objective that they do not just learn the notes or pass an exam, but that they intellectually relate the music that they are engaging with to the world around them.

 

Download:

 

 • Pupil Study Plan Introduction

 • Pupil Study Plan Template

 • Instrumental and vocal teaching in the postmodern era

Feldenkrais Method

In my teaching I incorporate the ideas of the Feldenkrais Method. Mosche Feldenkrais devised Awareness Through Movement lessons through which students learn how to realise their full human potential. Through exploring gentle physical motions, students develop greater self-awareness as well as greater skill and efficiency in carrying out whatever they are doing. The Method improves posture, balance and coordination, and opens up our senses and the innate ability to learn.

 

Applied to piano teaching, the Method suggests a gentle, experiential way of learning. It can also help to prevent playing-related injuries, and correct unbeneficial habits at the keyboard.

 

As a life philosophy, it emphasises the need for mental and physical development to go hand in hand, the pleasures of learning at a gentle pace, and the importance of the process rather than the result. A student of the Feldenkrais Method is therefore one who is open-minded and sensitive to the expressive power of music and enjoys life-long learning.

 

Information about Feldenkrais including free lessons.

Alan Fraser explains how the Method applies to piano playing.

 

Download:

 

 • Tau Wey's lecture on 'The Art of Practising'

 • The holistic approach to musical success

Theory

I teach ABRSM Theory Grade 1-8.

Piano Accompaniment

I am available as a piano accompanist for concerts, competitions and exams.

Tau Wey - Head of Keyboard / Piano at Sevenoaks School in Kent

Teaching

Tau Wey - Head of Keyboard / Piano at Sevenoaks School in KentTeaching the piano is an important part of my life. In fact that's what I spend most of my time doing!

 

In my teaching practice I seek to inspire in my pupils a love for music, and to challenge them with artistic concepts which they may not have previously come across. I believe that every pupil is individual and special, and through the course of my teaching it is my aim to discover and nurture each pupil's particular abilities, talents, sensitivities and musical tastes.

 

Playing music is a highly demanding discipline, which one can excel at only with one's own devotion and countless hours of practice! As a teacher I endeavour to guide my pupils on this wonderful journey of music-making, encouraging each one to open their heart towards the beautiful expressive nature of music and what it tells us about the human condition.

Teaching Style

Beginners from the age of 6 learn to play the piano through simple nursery songs. The elements of pitch and rhythm are introduced through singing and clapping, and the concept of pulse is taught by getting the pupil to bounce a ball. The pupil is guided to approach the piano in a free, creative and unorthodox way.

 

This musical training is backed up by the teaching of music theory, composition and improvisation right from the beginning.

 

With this kind of early-years training, pupils develop a firm grasp of the main concepts of music, giving them foundations that exceed the value of just doing a prep-test or Grade 1.

 

Older pupils are guided in developing their technique and exposed to an unlimited range of styles of music. My teaching philosophy is that 'the pupil is always right'! Instead of relying on traditional teaching ideas, my aim is to help the pupil to discover what piano technique works best for them, and what styles of music they have most affinity for.

 

Pupils will frequently embark on music investigation assignments, in which they conduct their own research about a composer, a musical style, or a particular piece. I also guide my pupils in exploring the contemporary music of our time, as a way of interpreting modern culture. Whatever the pupil chooses to play, it is my objective that they do not just learn the notes or pass an exam, but that they intellectually relate the music that they are engaging with to the world around them.

 

Download:

 

 • Pupil Study Plan Introduction

 • Pupil Study Plan Template

 • Instrumental and vocal teaching in the postmodern era

Feldenkrais Method

In my teaching I incorporate the ideas of the Feldenkrais Method. Mosche Feldenkrais devised Awareness Through Movement lessons through which students learn how to realise their full human potential. Through exploring gentle physical motions, students develop greater self-awareness as well as greater skill and efficiency in carrying out whatever they are doing. The Method improves posture, balance and coordination, and opens up our senses and the innate ability to learn.

 

Applied to piano teaching, the Method suggests a gentle, experiential way of learning. It can also help to prevent playing-related injuries, and correct unbeneficial habits at the keyboard.

 

As a life philosophy, it emphasises the need for mental and physical development to go hand in hand, the pleasures of learning at a gentle pace, and the importance of the process rather than the result. A student of the Feldenkrais Method is therefore one who is open-minded and sensitive to the expressive power of music and enjoys life-long learning.

 

Information about Feldenkrais including free lessons.

Alan Fraser explains how the Method applies to piano playing.

 

Download:

 

 • Tau Wey's lecture on 'The Art of Practising'

 • The holistic approach to musical success

Theory

I teach ABRSM Theory Grade 1-8.

Piano Accompaniment

I am available as a piano accompanist for concerts, competitions and exams.

Teaching

Tau Wey - Head of Keyboard / Piano at Sevenoaks School in Kent

Teaching the piano is an important part of my life. In fact that's what I spend most of my time doing!

 

In my teaching practice I seek to inspire in my pupils a love for music, and to challenge them with artistic concepts which they may not have previously come across. I believe that every pupil is individual and special, and through the course of my teaching it is my aim to discover and nurture each pupil's particular abilities, talents, sensitivities and musical tastes.

 

Playing music is a highly demanding discipline, which one can excel at only with one's own devotion and countless hours of practice! As a teacher I endeavour to guide my pupils on this wonderful journey of music-making, encouraging each one to open their heart towards the beautiful expressive nature of music and what it tells us about the human condition.

Teaching Style

Beginners from the age of 6 learn to play the piano through simple nursery songs. The elements of pitch and rhythm are introduced through singing and clapping, and the concept of pulse is taught by getting the pupil to bounce a ball. The pupil is guided to approach the piano in a free, creative and unorthodox way.

 

This musical training is backed up by the teaching of music theory, composition and improvisation right from the beginning.

 

With this kind of early-years training, pupils develop a firm grasp of the main concepts of music, giving them foundations that exceed the value of just doing a prep-test or Grade 1.

 

Older pupils are guided in developing their technique and exposed to an unlimited range of styles of music. My teaching philosophy is that 'the pupil is always right'! Instead of relying on traditional teaching ideas, my aim is to help the pupil to discover what piano technique works best for them, and what styles of music they have most affinity for.

 

Pupils will frequently embark on music investigation assignments, in which they conduct their own research about a composer, a musical style, or a particular piece. I also guide my pupils in exploring the contemporary music of our time, as a way of interpreting modern culture. Whatever the pupil chooses to play, it is my objective that they do not just learn the notes or pass an exam, but that they intellectually relate the music that they are engaging with to the world around them.

 

Download:

 

Feldenkrais Method

In my teaching I incorporate the ideas of the Feldenkrais Method. Mosche Feldenkrais devised Awareness Through Movement lessons through which students learn how to realise their full human potential. Through exploring gentle physical motions, students develop greater self-awareness as well as greater skill and efficiency in carrying out whatever they are doing. The Method improves posture, balance and coordination, and opens up our senses and the innate ability to learn.

 

Applied to piano teaching, the Method suggests a gentle, experiential way of learning. It can also help to prevent playing-related injuries, and correct unbeneficial habits at the keyboard.

 

As a life philosophy, it emphasises the need for mental and physical development to go hand in hand, the pleasures of learning at a gentle pace, and the importance of the process rather than the result. A student of the Feldenkrais Method is therefore one who is open-minded and sensitive to the expressive power of music and enjoys life-long learning.

 

Information about Feldenkrais including free lessons.

 

Alan Fraser explains how the Method applies to piano playing.

 

Download:

 

Theory

I teach ABRSM Theory Grade 1-8.

Piano Accompaniment

I am available as a piano accompanist for concerts, competitions and exams.